Cedarvale, Humewood - Toronto, Ontario neighbourhoods and nearby communities



These two communities lie between Eglinton and St Clair and Oakwood ad Bathurst, and are diagonally separated by Vaugahn Road, with Cedarvale and its name-sake raving to the north. Cedarvale has an established Jewish community that anchors Bathurst Street, with its Holy Blossom Temple and Beth Tzedec Synagogue. The area was developed back in 1912 when Sir Henry Mill Pellatt, of Casa Loma fame, who named it for the raving (vale) and the many cedars in the ravine's lower areas. In 1966, the Spadina Expressway was going to be extended through the ravine, but community activists preserved it. Humewood is a quiet neighbourhood with few through streets, and was named for the 1850 estate of a prominent Toronto lawyer. His land was subdivided in the late 1800s and the estate's laneway became Humewood Drive

Motorists get downtown via Bathurst Street, or take the Allen Road Expressway up to Highway 401. TTC bus service on Bathurst Street, and Oakwood connects to the Bloor-Danforth subway line and busses along Vaughan Road and Eglinton Avenue Road connects to the Eglinton West station on the Yonge-University-Spadina subway line.

Schools

The community is served by 3 elementary schools, 1 Jewish elementary, 1 Catholic elementary, 2 libraries, and 2 high schools. De La Salle College is on Avenue Road at Farnham, George Brown College is just south of Davenport, St Michael's College is nearby at Bathurst & St Clair. University of Toronto and Ryerson University are accessed via the Yonge-University-Spadina subway.

Shopping

This area is surrounded by good shopping. Eglinton Avenue West has high end fashion, specialty food shops, and great restaurants. Vaughan Road, between Oakwood Avenue and Dufferin, has a concentration of Caribbean shops & restaurants. In the south, there is a good shopping district along St Clair Avenue West.

Recreation

There is a paved recreational pathway through the Cedarvale Ravine that continues to Casa Loma, which is a part of the historic Belt Line Railway (1880 commuter railway). The community has 2 ice arenas, 1 indoor pool. 1 outdoor pool, a sports field, baseball diamond, a basketball court, and several playgrounds.

Homes

Humewood's homes were built between1910 and1925 and typically in the Tudor, English Cottage, and Edwardian style. Cedarvale's homes built between 1920 and 1950 are mostly Tudor and Georgian style, with the highest priced homes overlooking the ravine. There are also townhouses and apartment buildings (including some unique art deco walk aup apartments) along the main thoroughfares. Homes in this community range from low-medium to luxury price ranges.

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